On Choosing A Web Host: My Best Is Not Your Best

There are 1000 hosting companies in the world and they all claim they are the best.

And majority of them are, in fact, correct.

Because “Best” is relative.

What’s best for me is best for (well) me. What’s best for you might not be right for me.

If I am hosting my school projects that I only need the site to be alive for the next 6 months, a free web host with limited features like 000 Web Host or Award Space would be *the best* for me.

Not only that your “Best” hosting provider – like this one, that gives ultra fast network, excessive server resource,  and spoon-fed customer support that charges $200/month is not best, it’s not even in my first 100 consideration list.

Truth is – those looking to emerge on the internet have a slew of options and an abundance of hosting providers.  You have got your free web hosting services – as mention earlier. Then there’s shared, VPS, dedicated, cloud, as well as managed cloud (something only seen recently).

It really depends on what you want and need; and how much you are willing to pay. Different websites have different needs – you should select a host that suits your budget and requirements.

Knowing your needs before signing up the “best” hosting

So what does your website need from its host?

Can you answer that question in clear-written bullet points? Some basic questions to ask yourself include:

  • What kind of website or blog are you building?
  • Are you going to build and host just one website; or multiple?
  • Do you need to park a lot of unused domain names with this host?
  • Do you want something common (a WordPress blog, perhaps) so it’s easier to get help?
  • Do you need Windows applications?
  • Do you need support for a specific programming language (like Java or Python)?
  • How much your website traffic is going to grow for the next 6 months?

Hosting Reviews and Best Lists?

Don’t rely too much on what you can find on Google – 9 out of 10 of these “best hosting listing” are heavily biased and manipulated by affiliate commission. There’s a reason why people nowadays all push for iPage, SiteGround, BlueHost, Hostgator, and so on as the “Best” web host. Because these are the companies that pay the fattest commission.

Look for lists that rank a web host based on performance data and real user reviews. Usually this means the list consists of both popular and less well-known names. Check site owner’s credibility before trusting their reviews and advice.

If a deal sounds too good to be true – very likely it is.

Here are three best hosting list I found useful – there are data-driven, comes with clear earning disclosures, and their authors are out from the dark (known for their reputation). If you were looking for a web host, start with the brands mentioned in these guide.

Characteristics of a good web host

To say any hosting service is best (or even good), they should perform exceptionally well in following aspects with consistency:

  1. Server performance – How often your host goes down? Is your host loading quick? Does the company provide SLA on server and network uptime? What is the compensation if your server goes down?
  2. Hosting upgrade options – Is there room to grow? Can you upgrade your host easily?
  3. Numbers of addon domain – How many domains and websites can you host in one account? Domain names are so cheap these days – you WILL own more than one website.
  4. Costs – Simple question, can you afford the host?
  5. Email hosting – Can you host your own email?
  6. Site backup – How often is your account backup? Can you restore your backup by yourself easily? Does your host charge restoration fee?
  7. After-sales service – Can you get help easily?

Again – when you are choosing a hosting solution, bear in mind that what you want is to select the one that suits you the best. It’s not about finding the best web host in the world, it’s finding the best web host for your website and business.